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Road-Trip en Irlande, jour 7


[Index] [Jour 1] [Jour 2] [Jour 3] [Jour 4] [Jour 5] [Jour 6] [Jour 7] [Jour 8] [Jour 9] [Jour 10] [Jour 11] [Jour 12] [Jour 13] [Jour 14]


Kilfenora High crosses

Caherconnell Stone fort

Dolmen du poulnabrone

Ailwee cave

The burren

Corcomroe abbey

Dunguaire castle

Ross-errilly friary


Kilfenora High crosses

Quelques anciennes croix à voir dans une ancienne cathédrale. Sur le chemin du Burren, ne mérite pas le détour, mais quand c'est sur le chemin, un arrêt ne coûte rien.


Une des pièces de l'église


The Doorty's cross, recto


The Doorty's cross, verso


The North Cross


Caherconnell Stone fort

Fort préhistorique à l'entrée du burren. Correct sans plus. Au moins ici, on nous remet un guide qui nous présente de façon bien détaillée les différents lieux de vie de ce fort et on nous explique ce qui y a été trouvé.

Built over 1,000 years ago, Caherconnell was occupied as late as the 17th Century.
Caherconnell is an ancient and exceptionally well-preserved Celtic stone ringfort in The Burren.


Reconstitution


L'entrée du fort


Intérieur du fort


"Fire Pit"


Les cairns au sud du fort


Tombe


Dolmen du poulnabrone

A l'entrée du burren, un ancien dolmen. Bien situé pour avoir une première vue sur le burren.

Poulnabrone dolmen is a portal tomb in the Burren, County Clare, Ireland, dating back to the Neolithic period, probably between 4200 BC and 2900 BC. The dolmen consists of a twelve-foot, thin, slab-like, tabular capstone supported by two slender portal stones, which support the capstone 1.8 m from the ground, creating a chamber in a 9 m low cairn. The cairn helped stabilize the tomb chamber, and would have been no higher during the Neolithic. The entrance faces north and is crossed by a low sill stone.


Ailwee cave

Une grotte. Rien de bien spectaculaire dans cette grotte. Plusieurs cascades d'eau visibles, il paraît qu'après 3 ou 4 jours de grandes pluies la caverne que nous visitons est inondé. En hiver elle est même fermée car inaccessible. C'est finalement ce qui est sans doute le plus impressionnant : imaginer que cette grotte (quand même assez grande) puisse se remplir aussi vite.


tunnel creusé par l'eau

Aillwee Cave is a cave in the karst landscape of the Burren The name Aillwee is derived from the Irish Aill Bhuí which means "yellow cliff".

The cave system consists of over a kilometre of passages leading into the heart of the mountain. Its features include an underground river and a waterfall as well as some large stalactites and stalagmites. The remains of bears can also be seen inside the caves and allusions have been made to it being the last bear den in Ireland.


Petite cascatelle qui deviendra grande selon la saison


Petites stalactites


The burren

Impressionnante ces montagnes. Il a fallu que j'arrive dans cette partie de l'Irlande pour enfin avoir un sentiment de dépaysement. Très bizarre cette montagne. De loin, on ne perçoit que le gris, de près, la forme de cette roche est très particulière. Assez saisissant.

The Burren is a karst landscape.

It measures approximately 250 square kilometres. The Burren National Park is one of six National Parks in Ireland and the smallest in size (15 km²).

The rolling hills of Burren are composed of limestone pavements with criss-crossing cracks known as "grikes", leaving isolated rocks called "clints". The region supports arctic, Mediterranean and alpine plants side-by-side, due to the unusual environment. The limestones, which date from the Visean stage of the Lower Carboniferous, formed as sediments in a tropical sea approximately 350 million years ago. The strata contain fossil corals, crinoids, sea urchins and ammonites.

Glaciation during the Quaternary period facilitated greater denudation. The result is that the Burren is one of the finest examples of a glacio-karst landscape in the world.

Three quarters of Ireland's species of flowers are found in the Burren.


Corcomroe abbey

Bon, ben une abbaye :-) Je ne m'en lasse pas.

Corcomroe Abbey is an early 13th-century Cistercian monastery located in the north of the Burren. Construction on the abbey most likely began sometime between 1205 and 1210 and used local limestone.

It was once known as "St. Mary of the Fertile Rock", a reference to the Burren's fertile soil.

The abbey is noted for its detailed carvings and other rich ornamentation, which are not commonly found in structures from this period. It features a typical cruciform church facing east, with a small chapel in each transept.


Dunguaire castle

Moins de château que d'abbaye en ruines en Irlande. Ce château a fait l'objet d'une restauration et propose des banquets médiévales chaque soir de la saison. Visite courte, trois étages a voir + la terrasse avec la vue sur le lac. Un peu cher a mon goût pour ce qu'on y trouve. Espérons que l'option avec banquet médiéval soit plus intéressante. Avantage de la visite, ça permette de voir l'intérieur d'une "tower house" ce qui change un peu des ruines a un étage et demi. Rez de chaussée, pseudo salle des gardes (l'accueil donc), premier étage le grand hall ou salle des banquets. Deuxième étage : le salon, troisième étage : la chambre. Ça parait très petit quand on est a l'intérieur. Comme quoi extérieurement l'épaisseur des murs comptent !

Dunguaire Castle is a 16th-century tower house. The castle was built by the Hynes clan around 1520, a family who may have been associated with the area since around 662.
The name derives from the Dun of King Guaire, the legendary king of Connacht.


Ross-errilly friary

Un beau monastère, très labyrinthique.

The Ross Errilly Friary is a medieval Franciscan friary. It is a National Monument of Ireland and among the best-preserved medieval monastic sites in the country. Though usually referred to by locals as "Ross Abbey," this is not technically correct as the community never had an abbot.


Un Jésus caché

The church and bell tower are to the south of a small but well preserved central cloister and domestic buildings are to the north. Amongst these are a kitchen (equipped with an oven and a water tank for live fish), a bake house, and a refectory or dining area. The dormitories are on the upper levels. One unusual feature is a second courtyard or cloister, built to accommodate the friary's growing population.

Like many other abandoned Christian sites in Ireland, Ross Errilly has continued to be used as a burial ground by area residents. In addition to tombs that date from the friary's active period, many graves dating from the 18th through 20th centuries can be found inside the church walls. In some cases, tombstones comprise the floors of walkways and crawlspaces.


[Index] [Jour 1] [Jour 2] [Jour 3] [Jour 4] [Jour 5] [Jour 6] [Jour 7] [Jour 8] [Jour 9] [Jour 10] [Jour 11] [Jour 12] [Jour 13] [Jour 14]

 


 

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